Tagged: writing

Surprise from outer space | Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo

Surprise from outer space | Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo

Surprise from outer space | Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo, acrylic on canvas, 90×60, 2005

The title of this one is exactly the same of a short story of mine, Surprise From Outer Space  (that you can download). The painting, which came out first (2005), has nothing to do with the story. The homonymy is purely coincidental. By the way, a detail of this painting serves as header for this very blog.

Il titolo di questo è esattamente lo stesso di un mio racconto, Surprise From Outer Space. Il dipinto, che è arrivato per primo (2005), non ha niente a che vedere col racconto. L’omonimia è puramente fortuita. A proposito, un dettaglio di questo dipinto funge da testata proprio di questo blog.

Surprise From Outer Space: a short story

That’s right, you read right: here is a little short story of mine, Surprise From Outer Space, and you can download it for free by clicking here (PDF format). As a director and cartoonist, I …

Source: Surprise From Outer Space: a short story

What’s in a Title?

Cardboard TownsAs some of you may have noticed, the titles of my paintings are usually what’s intended for “incongruous”. I often get asked what the heck I mean with them, so I’m writing down a couple lines about this nasty habit.

In an interview that appeared on the first issue of the Journal Of Urban Cultural Studies, by professor Benjamin Fraser of The College of Charleston (and that you can download here), I said:

Portrait of bagpiper | Ritratto di zampognaro

Portrait of bagpiper | Ritratto di zampognaro, acrylic on canvas, 70×100, 2008

“[…] The titles of my paintings never reflect what’s depicted in the painting – I find this superfluous, redundant. Why write ‘Town at Dusk’ under a picture showing a town at dusk? That’s just to make an inventory. For me, it’s better to write a title that has nothing to do with the picture. The link, or the crush, between the image and the words becomes interesting, sometimes humorous even if mysterious or just stupid. So my titles are usually absurd, preposterous, and they often make me laugh. For instance, there is a series of Still Lifes that actually are not still lifes, being urban landscapes instead; there is a series of Portraits that are not at all portraits – for instance, Ritratto di Zampognaro/Portrait of Bagpiper has just a huge industrial building in a reddish evening sky in it. Others communicate a series of instructions or warnings: best before, area under video surveillance, authorized personnel only, to be kept dry, keep out of reach of children, etc. – slightly sinister phrases that you find on a box, on a door, in the street and that I use as preposterous titles. I owe this to Dadaism and surrealism, Magritte in particular.”

This applies to sketches as well: the Fried Sketches, the Sleepy and Awake Sketches, the Hungry Sketches, and so on.

I’ll add now a few more or less silly & serious speculations, in no particular order, that should be taken just as light entertaining material.

  • The Time Machine interpretation: such titles could work as a cheap Time Machine both for the past and the future. For the past, in case of canvas reuse they might refer to what was painted before, so they’d be relics of a faded era, a matter for historians or archaeologists. For the future, they’d prefigure what will be painted on it one day, an outlook on things to come – as in a cheesy-charlatan prophecy.
  • The Revolutionary interpretation: such titles could undermine the widespread tagging system in social network information era. No google, twitter or fb tag could work properly with these titles, unless you (or someone else) add the correct, dull one. It’s you, not the painting, that is mashed into the aforementioned system.
  • The Uncertainity Principle interpretation: if you are looking at the painting you can’t read the title, and vice versa. Such titles demonstrate this principle. A lot of people just love this largely misunderstood little idea of Heisenberg’s Quantum Mechanics and use it absolutely over the top, so why not to do it here, anyway?
  • The Huckster Interpretation: just a (not so) clever strategy to draw attention and get followers, buyers, honour and wealth. If that’s so, I’ll tell you the day this really happens.

What else? Well, it’s up to you, now. If you have anything to say about this, just write it out.

mb

A Short Story: Surprise From Outer Space

Surprise FromOuter Space short story

Surprise FromOuter Space short story e-book cover

I’m reposting a little short story of mine, Surprise From Outer Space, and you can download it for free by clicking here (PDF format). As a director and cartoonist, I have written scripts for animated series, feature projects and a bunch of more stuff, including short stories.

What is this all about? Well, it’s some science fiction, even if you won’t find starships, alien creatures or teletransportation in it. It’s the story of an unlikely event that changes life on earth, as seen by a lonesome astronomer (who is longing for a juicy beefsteak). I’ll say no more – it’d be a surprise, after all, wouldn’t it be?

Enjoy – and comment, if you feel like. Download.

By the way, there is also a painting of mine with the same title Surprise From Outer Space, which has nothing to do with the story.

Surprise from outer space | Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo

Surprise from outer space | Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo, acrylic on canvas, 90×60, 2005

mb

Download Surprise From Outer Space – a short story by Marco Bigliazzi

Surprise From Outer Space: a short story

Surprise FromOuter Space short story

Surprise FromOuter Space short story e-book cover

That’s right, you read right: here is a little short story of mine, Surprise From Outer Space, and you can download it for free by clicking here (PDF format). As a director and cartoonist, I have written scripts for animated series, feature projects and a bunch of more stuff, including short stories.

What is this all about? Well, it’s some science fiction, even if you won’t find starships, alien creatures or teletransportation in it. It’s the story of an unlikely event that changes life on earth, as seen by a lonesome astronomer (who is longing for a juicy beefsteak). I’ll say no more – it’d be a surprise, after all, wouldn’t it be?

Enjoy – and comment, if you’re in the mood for.

mb

Download Surprise From Outer Space – a short story by Marco Bigliazzi

A little literary announcement | Un annuncio letterario

Cardboard TownsAs an animated film director and writer, I have worked on several storylines and scripts for short films, feature projects and series episodes. That’s writing for the screen, but I have also written a bunch of other stuff, including short stories.

In the next days – or more likely weeks – I’ll start publishing some of this stuff, which will be downloadable for free. The very first one will be Surprise From Outer Space, and deals with an unexpected event that will change the life on Earth.

By the way, there is also a painting of mine with the same title, but it has nothing to see with the short story – of course. A detail of this painting – which is a favorite of mine – is the image header of this very blog.

In qualità di regista e sceneggiatore di film d’animazione, ho lavorato a diversi soggetti e sceneggiature di cortometraggi, progetti di lungometraggi, e episodi di serie. Ho però anche scritto un bel po’ d’altra roba, tra cui dei racconti.

Nei prossimi giorni – o settimane – inizierò a pubblicare qui qualcuno di questi, scaricabile gratuitamente. Il primo sarà Sorpresa dallo spazio profondo, e ha a che vedere con un evento inatteso che cambierà la vita sul nostro pianetino.

A proposito, c’è un mio dipinto con lo stesso titolo, che non ha ovviamente niente a che vedere con il racconto. Un dettaglio di questo quadro è la striscia in alto di questo blog.